Things that matter.


Photoset

Jul 27, 2014
@ 7:30 pm
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16,539 notes

zoewashburne:

What were your inspirations, especially since [Tauriel] is a completely created character; what brought you to bring that power because there were a lot of ways you could have played that role that would have been along the lines of what we usually see for a girl in an action movie where she’s not in the adventure, she’s the prize…?

 

Wouldn’t it be great if there were a lot of female characters who actually speak and do things and matter in books, movies, TV, etc., so that we could have a whole range of female characters to represent us and choose from as our personal favorite type of heroine, instead of trying to have one single female character who gets it “right.”

I’m not willing to burn “strong” female characters until we have enough female characters period that sacrificing any of them because they aren’t perfect won’t actually ensure we basically have zero female characters available. I want to see more lady characters, not less, and on behalf of the ladies who aren’t compassionate, feminine and graceful, FUCK THIS.

(Source: halfabubble, via wafflesforleslie)


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Jul 27, 2014
@ 2:40 pm
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Charter school operators (like health insurers who exclude potentially costly applicants) have developed methods to screen out applicants who are likely to depress overall test scores. Sifting mechanisms may include interviews with parents (since parents of low-performing students are less likely to show up for the interview), essays by students, letters of recommendation and scrutiny of attendance records. Low-achieving students enrolled in charters can, for example, be recommended for special education programs that the school lacks, thus forcing their transfer to a traditional public school. (More brazenly, some schools have experienced, and perhaps even encouraged, rampant cheating on standardized tests.) Operators have clear motives to avoid students who require special services (i.e., English-language learners, “special needs” children and so on) and those who are unlikely to produce the high achievement test scores that form the basis of school evaluations. Whether intended or otherwise, these sifting mechanisms have the ultimate effect of reinscribing racial and economic segregation among the students they educate — as the research on this topic is increasingly bearing out.

empathyeducates – Why the Racist History of the Charter School Movement Is Never Discussed


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Jul 26, 2014
@ 2:25 pm
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327 notes

If America was serious about fixing the troubled parts of its education system, then we would be having a fundamentally different conversation.
We wouldn’t be talking about budget austerity — we would be talking about raising public revenues to fund special tutoring, child care, basic health programs and other so-called wraparound services at low-income schools.
We wouldn’t only be looking to make sure that schools in high-poverty districts finally receive the same amount of public money as schools in wealthy neighborhoods — we would make sure high-poverty districts actually receive more funds than rich districts because combating poverty is such a resource-intensive endeavor.
More broadly, we wouldn’t be discussing cuts to social safety net programs — we would instead be working to expand those programs and, further, to challenge both parties’ anti-tax, anti-regulation, pro-austerity agenda that has increased poverty and economic inequality.
In short, if we were serious about education, then our education discussion wouldn’t be focused on demonizing teachers and coming up with radical schemes to undermine traditional public schools. It would instead be focused on mounting a new war on poverty and thus directly addressing the biggest education problem of all.

Poverty is America’s #1 Education Problem

http://www.alternet.org/education/poverty-americas-1-education-problem?paging=off&current_page=1#bookmark

It’s time to get real about this. 

(via weareteachers)


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Jul 26, 2014
@ 11:36 am
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Ladies and gentlemen, we give you the official 2014 platform of the Republican Party of Texas, 40 pages of unrestrained, right-wing bluster against you name it — women, minorities, immigrants, Muslims, gays, Obamacare, the Internal Revenue Service, red light cameras, the EPA, the World Bank, vaccinations — well, you get the picture.

Deep in the Tell-Tale Heart of the Texas GOP | Michael Winship

Texas republicans are religious and political extremists.


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Jul 26, 2014
@ 11:28 am
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In 2011, both houses of the Texas Legislature were controlled by large Republican majorities, and their redistricting decisions were designed to increase the Republican Party’s electoral prospects at the expense of the Democrats.

— Greg Abbot (via Greg Abbott, Texas AG, Acknowledges GOP Redistricting Decisions Made ‘At The Expense Of The Democrats’)


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Jul 26, 2014
@ 9:26 am
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50,064 notes

But the 8-hour workday is too profitable for big business, not because of the amount of work people get done in eight hours (the average office worker gets less than three hours of actual work done in 8 hours) but because it makes for such a purchase-happy public. Keeping free time scarce means people pay a lot more for convenience, gratification, and any other relief they can buy. It keeps them watching television, and its commercials. It keeps them unambitious outside of work.

We’ve been led into a culture that has been engineered to leave us tired, hungry for indulgence, willing to pay a lot for convenience and entertainment, and most importantly, vaguely dissatisfied with our lives so that we continue wanting things we don’t have. We buy so much because it always seems like something is still missing.

Your Lifestyle Has Already Been Designed (via theaurore)

(Source: beccap, via newmodelminority)


Text

Jul 26, 2014
@ 8:45 am
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6,660 notes

ask-an-mra-anything:

sure we’ve never had a woman president, the majority of politicians and CEOs are men, a woman needs a masters degree just to make the same money as a man with a BA doing the same job, rape cases are grossly under prosecuted, and we teach young girls that they’re “asking for” rape based on what they’re wearing

but let’s talk about the REAL issues like how some woman on the internet is selling a coffee mug with the words “male tears” printed on it

(via wafflesforleslie)


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Jul 25, 2014
@ 11:55 am
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Our teachers are leaving because high-stakes testing robs children of the joy of learning. My students take a STAAR-style test in every subject, tested or not, each six weeks. We write curriculum around the exam. Teachers, especially in low-income schools, are shackled to the demands of the test. Students view education as being about tests, not learning.

The heartbreak of being a teacher in Texas


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Jul 25, 2014
@ 9:48 am
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Companies are making more per dollar of sales than they ever have before… Wages as a percent of the economy just hit another all-time low. Why are corporate profits so high? One reason is that companies are paying employees less than they ever have as a share of GDP.

Profits At High, Wages At Low - Business Insider


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Jul 24, 2014
@ 10:55 am
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Reporters don’t do readers a service by painting a portrait of a normal, even-tempered guy who was like any one of us, until he wasn’t. The context for the Haskell story, and so many others, is domestic violence, which is not a crime of passion, but in many ways the opposite. “It’s power and control, that’s what it’s all about,” says Jane Aoyama-Martin, the executive director of the Pace Women’s Justice Center, which provides legal services to victims of domestic and elder abuse. “It sort of creeps along, and it escalates during the relationship.” It’s when a woman tries to leave that she’s most likely to be killed – the batterer reaches for the ultimate control, life and death. In the case of Haskell’s ex-wife, the abuser kept coming after they’d divorced, and she was trying to start her life over. The results are a tragedy times six.

Saying that a killer ‘snapped’ is not an explanation for domestic violence - The Washington Post